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20130115
20130123
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
companies pay less attention to shareholders? whole foods c.e.o. john mackey joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." many american companies are gearing up to go public and investors are warming up to the idea of buying those shares. the success of the initial public offering of norwegian cruise lines on the nasdaq today could kick off a new wave of i.p.o.s. shares of the third largest cruise line operator in the u.s., skyrocketed more than 30%, from its $19 opening price. as erika miller reports, thanks to the bullish run in the stock market it could be full steam ahead for i.p.o.s. >> reporter: although 2012 was not exactly a banner year for initial public offerings, investment bankers expect things to improve this year. 8% of capital markets executives think there will be a substantial gain. 42% see a modest increase. but still one in five expect fewer companies to go public. this is according to a recent survey by consulting firm b.d.o. for i.p.o.s, much depends on what happens to the u.s. stock market. >> the i.p.o. market is very schizophrenic. the window for
businesses need to consider all stakeholders, not just shareholders. john mackey is the co-founder and co-c.e.o. of whole foods market. he's author of "conscious capitalism: liberating the heroic spirit of business". john, why is concentrating on shareholders a myth as you call it? >> i don't know if concentrating on shareholders is a myth. i mean, most companies do concentrate on their shareholders. it's just not the best business strategy. because you have an interdependent stakeholder system where you need to create value for all of the stakeholders, and that will also create value for your investors or shareholders. for example, at whole foods market, we have to create value for our team members. if they're happy and fulfilled in their work, then they will take care of our customers better and that will result in them being happy alcohol result in the investors being happy. happy team members result in happy cut can mers which result in happy investors. they're all interdependent on one another. >> tom: is that the priority you put the stakeholders in, employees over customers over sh
is whole foods holding up? we ask c.e.o. john mackey. and our friday "market monitor" guest says now is not the time to get too aggressive with your investments. he's glenmede investment's jason pride. >> susie: and monday on "n.b.r.," we take a special look at u.s. innovation. will america be able to keep its competitive edge, through new technologies and entrepreneurship? what better place to answer that question that at i.b.m.'s watson research center. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s "chief geek," and leads the firm's efforts on innovation. >> innovation determines whether a large corporation, a small corporation, a startup or an entire society survive. it's that simple. the most direct attribute you can give to a thriving entity, i don't care what scale it is small, medium, large, enormous, is innovation. the reason is fundamentally to not only see the future, but to drive it. >> susie: join us monday for our look at u.s. innovation. it's our special martin luther king junior holiday edition. and, there's more to learn about innovation, on the "n.b.r." website. "nbr-u" has
. >> reporter: house speaker john boehner said republicans were willing to suspend the debt ceiling for three months. sending democrats to act. >> it has been nearly four years since the senate has done a budget. most americans believe you don't do your job, you shouldn't get paid. that's the basis. no budget; no pay. it is time for the senate to act. >> reporter: the white house called the move by house republicans "significant," though the administration still argues a short-term extension of borrowing authority does not go far enough. >> what we support is a long- term raising of the debt ceiling so that we don't have any doubt or uncertainty for businesses or the global economy about the simple proposition that the united states always pays its bills. >> reporter: at a house hearing on the debt ceiling debate, simon johnson, a former chief economist for the i.m.f. warned the continuing controversy could roil global markets and hurt the u.s. at home. >> if you don't raise the debt ceiling now, or if you postpone this confrontation, if you say every 60, 90, or 100 days, we're going to again
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)